Work 250; Sixty Four Tombstones

Tate Modern forum code AW3
64 Tombstones
Sixty Four Tombstones
( A Dada Tribute to Andy Warhol )
c. Michael St.Mark, 2006

( 1160KB digital composite collage) Click through twice for close-up.
To be offered for sale as one signed 50 X 50cm print.

For details of reproduction and royalty rights for the work, contact MstM.

This New Dada work would represent a significant investment opportunity for the discerning art collector.
Please see Intro ( Tags on right of page) & scroll for purchase opportunities of New Dadaists works displayed in 691.

NB; If you feel this is in poor taste, you’ve yet to research the high antics of the man himself, including having a hidden camera installed in the washroom of his NYC apartment to snap visiting celebrities’ obulations and nose-powderings.
You gotta admit, the boy had style

In any case salutations are surely due, for the sheer genius of someone who engineers his own artistic legend on the back of producing a silkscreen of 100 Campbell’s soup cans, in an appropriately ironic and Dadaistic manner.

MStM

warhol01
warhol ~One-Hundred-Cans-1962
One Hundred Cans
by Andy Warhol, 1962

10 thoughts on “Work 250; Sixty Four Tombstones

  1. interesting…

    what do I think of the man A-W?

    hmmm…He was Powerful…to sum it up in 1 word!

    His Films…total Crap! I watched one on Film 4 a few months back – abot some Junky who was looked after by some strangers…wierd!

    Clever Influencer!

    Like

    • Yeah he started out as quite a talented commercial artist and later on experimented with photography and film – the latter very experimentally. . .paint-dryingly so for some.

      But he was backed by the entire art establishment who bought everything he did, in some ways it was a license for them all to print money, so he was no struggling Vincent VG.

      Brian Eno did something along Warhol lines in the early 1990s I think, by pointing a video camera out of his NY high rise and leaving it to run for hours. Only it was mounted sideways to the horizon so as you had to turn the television on its side as well, to watch. . .

      BTW Congratulations on your exhibition successes Dean.
      Here’s to a lot more of that.

      Like

  2. Yes Kiki, on one level Andy was new, but really, when you look carefully at his works, it was all on a very surfacey level, as Hektor is insinuating, with little depth or enduring meaning to it.

    That’s, in a way, what I’m trying to re-enforce and highlight with the 64 Tombstones image, the utter vacuuity and total lack of spirituality that, at the end of the day, he was really about.

    The perfect icon for a brutal materialistic age.

    ( and yes, the arts and media Jewish people worldwide do look after and promote their own. . .big time.)
    BTW. I don’t think this is anit-Semitic, it’s just how it is.

    Like

    • And you showed it well, also explained it2me in a great way, thanks šŸ™‚
      No, it’s not anti-semitic, i love all the world and cultures,as you to, we are all humans but is the Reality indeed.. i think everyone is aware of it!
      Cloudy but hot huh? Today i’m going to the Brit.Museum.
      See you Mike and hugs2you
      kiki

      Like

  3. šŸ˜€ Wow Mike, this is a great one! Poor taste or not, it depends on the person always, BUT YES we have to admit he had style and did a LOT of different and great work, some of which are really great pieces of art! In his time he was a Dada one too! šŸ˜‰ wasn’t he?
    I’m in London town just now šŸ˜€ Yes! I love this place as well as my country too :))
    Hugs2u Mike
    kiki

    Like

    • I suppose you could call Andy a “commercial Dadaist”. He quite ruthlessly exploited and manipulated the media of the day and used others around him and in his circle of “pets” ( albeit in a gentler and even supportive way).
      His Jewish background and the fact that the New York art scene and especially the galleries were (and very much still are) Jewish-owned and controlled, certainly helped him to become established by offering him his first exhibitions in the very early days.

      Like

      • Yes! you are so right! That’s it! wow, didn’t know he was Jewish, that’s new to me that one, thanks šŸ™‚

        Yes, he did the toilet camera from what I have already read about him. He really was a weird guy huh? :)) hahaha yes he was, but wow how commercial..I don’t like commercialism even on songs, movies,etc… but he had new ideas.. I mean different ones for his time.
        Yes, he had lots of strange ‘ pets ‘ :)) hahahaha u made me laugh with this one!

        Yes, always and for a long time Jewish people always helped themselves a lot! They aren’t like others indeed, they really only ever help their own!

        Hugs2u Mike
        kiki

        Like

  4. quoth eye in 100 per cent. the lyrics here of David Bowie (father of Zowie Bowie):

    Andy Warhole:

    (this is andy warhole and its take one, take one)
    Its, its warhol actually
    (what did I say)
    Whole, its whole as in wholes
    (andy warhol)
    Wah, andy war hol, andy war hol (he)
    Like whole hub
    He
    Ha
    Are you ready
    (yeah)
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha

    Like to take a cement fix
    Be a standing cinema
    Dress my friends up just for show
    See them as they really are
    Put a peephole in my brain
    Two new pence to have a go
    Id like to be a gallery
    Put you all inside my show

    Andy warhol looks a scream
    Hang him on my wall
    Andy warhol, silver screen
    Cant tell them apart at all

    Andy walking, andy tired
    Andy take a little snooze
    Tie him up when hes fast asleep
    Send him on a pleasant cruise (hm hm hm)
    When he wakes up on the sea
    He sure to think of me and you
    Hell think about paint and hell think about glue
    What a jolly boring thing to do

    Andy warhol looks a scream
    Hang him on my wall
    Andy warhol, silver screen
    Cant tell them apart at all

    Andy warhol looks a scream
    Hang him on my wall
    Andy warhol, silver screen
    Cant tell them apart at all

    (handclaps)

    Like

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